Houserules

  • Action Points
    You gain one action point at the start of the day and after each short rest. You can use any number of action points per combat. The DM also gains action points at the start of the session equal to the number of PCs to spend solely on Advantage and Disadvantage.
  • Advantage/Disadvantage
    Advantage grants two attack rolls and take the highest of the two, while disadvantage grants the same two attacks but take the lowest of the attacks. You can spend an action point to have advantage on a single attack or spend an action point to make an enemy have disadvantage on an attack involving you or an ally.
  • Alternative Rewards
    PCs are only allowed one (1) slotless Alternative Reward item (boons, grandmaster training, etc…) per tier.
  • Elite/Solo/PCs: Stuns and Dazes
    Elite or solo creatures that are dazed grant advantage to any attacker rather than losing actions. Stunned elite or solo creatures instead grant advantage to any attacker and suffer disadvantage on all their attacks while the status remains. PCs can choose to take these effects instead of the normal status debuffs of Stuns and Dazes.
  • Escalation Die
    After the first round of combat, the Escalation Die (a d6 and the larger the better) is placed in the center of the table. Starting in round 2 the die has the ‘1’ placed face up. This is the bonus the PCs gain to all attacks. This increases by one each round until a max of 6 is reached in round 7. This dice could include damage, hp regeneration, damage per round, defenses, and any plethora of abilities.
  • Fixed Enhancement Bonus
    At heart, a magic item’s purpose is to ensure that a character has the defenses and accuracy needed to confront the challenges of the game world. Magic weapons and implements keep attack modifiers high, while neck slot items and armor help ensure that characters survive their encounters. Replacing magic items with alternative rewards means fewer chances for the heroes to acquire key items. Without a means to compensate for such decreased resources, characters’ capacities would lag behind those of their opponents. Encounters at any given level become more challenging and character death more frequent. This magic equipment shortage can redress by adopting a set of fixed enhancement bonuses similar to those detailed in Dungeon Master’s Guide 2 (in the sidebar on page 138). At discrete levels, characters gain flat bonuses to attack rolls, damage rolls, and defenses. These flat bonuses do not stack with enhancement bonuses gained from magic items, and they progress at a slightly slower rate. As a result, magic swords, armor, and amulets retain their appeal.
  • Flee
    Fleeing is a party action rather than an individual action. At any point, on any PC’s turn, any player can propose that the fight is going so badly that the characters have to flee. If all of the other players agree, the heroes beat a hasty and successful retreat, carrying any fallen heroes away with them. In exchange for this extraordinarily generous retreating rule, the party suffers a campaign loss. At the GM’s discretion, something that the party was trying to do fails in a way that going back and finishing off those enemies later won’t fix. If the heroes were on their way to rescue a captive from unholy sacrifice, then naturally enough the captive gets sacrificed. Don’t worry, overcoming setbacks is exactly what heroism is about. The point of this rule is to encourage daring attacks and to make retreating interesting on the level of story rather than tactics.
  • Full Heal-ups
    Fate, karma, or some other subtle and unseen force propels the heroes through their adventures. As heroes, they prevail when they press on, not when they retreat and lick their wounds. Once the characters have fought about four battles, they earn a full heal-up. Lots of times, the characters take their heal-up by resting or by celebrating back in town. The characters have earned the heal-up and should enjoy it. Sometimes, however, the heal-up occurs in the middle of an adventure rather than at the end. Sometimes a paladin says pithy words over the fallen foes, and with that single sentence the battle-weary party regains the spirit and the strength to fight on.
    Roughly four battles: The GM determines when the party has earned a full heal-up. Canonically, fighting four average battles gets you a heal-up. This rule helps the party manage its resources, because you know about how much opposition you’re going to need to get through.
    Reset hit points, recoveries, and powers: Your hit points reset to full. You regain any surges you’ve used. All expended powers are regained or recharged (so that powers that are “daily” are actually “per heal-up”).This rule allows “per day” powers and spells to remain balanced relative to each other regardless of whether the party is fighting once per week or seven times a day. Another feature of this rule is that when the party has been beaten down, the best way to recover is to press on and win a few more battles.
    Forced heal-up: If the party is short of a heal-up but is too beat up to press on, they can retreat, tails between their legs. Provided they can find some sort of safe place, they can get the heal-up that they haven’t earned in battle. But taking the heal-up entails a campaign loss. At the GM’s discretion, the party fails to achieve one of their goals, and they fail in some way that simply defeating the bad guys the next time around with your healed-up party won’t fix. Don’t worry; occasional setbacks make for a more engaging campaign.
  • Stored Rituals
    Storing a ritual works the same as performing a ritual (PHB 298), including the ability for others to assist. It requires the same components and takes the same amount of time. At the end of the ritual, however, the ritual caster must expend a healing surge in order to lock the ritual into an item related to the ritual itself, known as a ritual object (a key for Knock, a desiccated tongue for Comprehend Languages, etc.).
    A ritual will remain stored in the object for a number of days equal to the character’s Intelligence modifier (min. 1). If a character has a stored ritual when he takes an extended rest, he recovers one fewer healing surge per stored ritual. For example, a wizard that normally had eight healing surges after each extended rest would only start with seven if he had stored a Detect Secret Doors ritual the previous day but had not used it yet.
    A character can store a number of rituals equal to his primary casting attribute modifier (min. 1).
    Using A Stored Ritual: It requires a standard action and the expenditure of another healing surge to use a stored ritual. The character must be holding the ritual object when he takes the action.
    Releasing A Stored Ritual: A character can release a stored ritual at any time as a free action. He need not be holding the ritual object, and the ritual magic dissipates without effect. He does not immediately regain his healing surge, but can recover it with an extended rest or other ability that allows the recovery of a healing surge.

Houserules

Solas: Flames of Rebellion dustyX